Sunday, February 6, 2011

Xbox DVD Laser Replacement

Had a SDG-605B Samsung DVD drive for the Xbox with a weak optical pickup. It uses the SOH-D16 pickup that as of 2010 was still available in Singapore (Just need to search alittle).
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Here’s a shot of both the new and replacement pickups. The new pickup doesn’t come with the drive gear, so we gotta transfer that over.
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And then next is a shot of the ESD protection solder joint. To protect the pickup during transport (the laser diode is really ESD sensitive), they’ve added this shorting joint. Gotta remove that before putting the pickup in.
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The new pickup even comes with tape on the objective lens to stop it from flopping around and getting scratched during transport.
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Here I’m removing the screw that secures the drive gear.
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Here’s it totally out, there’s a spring that takes up backlash, be careful to not drop it.
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I then put on a tiny drop of loctite to keep the screw in place.
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Here the gear’s now on the new pickup, ready to go into the drive.
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Taking the drive apart. These 4 screws hold the cover on.
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Remove both top and bottom covers, then get ready to eject the tray.
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Ejecting the tray for better access, on Samsung drives there's a lever you can push here to make the tray slide out.
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Tray out and everything dusted. Clean out all the buildup and dust you find within. Wouldn't want it falling into the new pickup.
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Flip the drive around and remove the control board assembly, 2 clips hold that in place.
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Board out and flipped up, you don't have to disconnect everything, just the laser interface cable is enough.
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Next undo the fasteners that hold the guide rails in place and set them aside. Then clean them to get rid of the old lubricant.
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After the drive is prepped, and you've discharged wadever static buildup (wrist-strap or just touching a grounded equipment prior). Desolder the ESD joints on the pickup.
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Here it's desoldered. A quick swipe across with a hot soldering iron will do the trick.
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Guide the new pickup in place, some creative angling may be required. You could pull the entire rail out and slot them back in later, but I prefer to disturb them as little as possible.
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A close up of the non geared side.
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Make sure the drive gear engages with the worm screw on the motor before pressing everything down.
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Pickup assembled in place.
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The guide rail retainers can only go in 1 way, a set of slots and tangs on the bottom ensures that.
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Retainers installed.
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Side shot of the retainer, make sure there's no gap between the rail and the retainer, if there is a gap, you've installed the retainer wrong, rotate it until the tangs match the machined grooves in the base.
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Using a syringe and a little bit of oil, I lube the rails.
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Next a little dab of grease on the worm gear. Don’t use more then needed, grease tends to trap dust.
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Board back in.
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Next flip the drive over and disengage the locking lever.
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Push and guide the interface cable in, then lock the lever while holding the cable in place.
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Here it is locked, just make sure the lock lever is totally flat.
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Afterwhich remove the tape that's holding the lens down.
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I then swab the lens to remove any tape residue, with a little window cleaner.
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Everything properly assembled.
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If you have problems with the drive not opening properly, now may be a good time to clean out this drive pulleys, as well as fit a new band or clean the existing one.
Oil or dirt can cause the band to slip, resulting in a stuck drive.
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Next assemble the covers back on.
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Sticking the drive in a test Xbox. Now reads everything like a new drive should. (CDs DVDs etc.)
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Good luck. xD

4 comments:

  1. A zillion thanks!!
    I totally forgot the ESD solder joints stuff...
    great stuff in your blog dude.

    Grettings from Chile!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have the same drive and it can only read audio cd's.Does not even acknowledge DVDs. Would you recommend a laser replacement? Thank you and very well documented repair.

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    Replies
    1. I would totally go for a laser replacement instead of getting an entire DVD drive. You could try tweaking one of the pots each time to see if DVDs can still be read?
      I can't remember which was CD and which was DVD (or was there even 2 pots).

      Before you do that though, make sure you can get replacement pickups, pot tweaking has been known to fry lasers.

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